Teaching Hope

By Victoria Lynn Hall (with Lori Evangelisto)

I recorded a talk I had with my friend Lori Evangelisto about teaching and education recently (click here to watch it on YouTube). Lori has over 27 years of experience in the field of Special Education. Most of her career has been in the area of working with severely traumatized youth. She has worked in public schools, alternative schools and state correctional institutions. She wrote her M.Ed thesis on Emotional Intelligence. She is very passionate about bringing the importance of teaching emotional intelligence to the forefront of education. 

I met Lori when we were both volunteers on Marianne Williamson’s presidential campaign. She deeply believes in the need to implement Marianne Williamson’s proposal for a cabinet level Department of Children and Youth. Lori’s goal is to awaken people to this need and to create programs where traumatized children can get the treatment they need as well as the education that they so often can’t obtain because of their symptoms.

Lori is the kind of teacher I wish I’d had more of in school; the kind who sees and hears her students as the unique individuals they are instead of just names on a roll call. It is obvious from listening to her talk about her job and her students that she views teaching as not just a job, but a calling and an opportunity to contribute her gifts to the world.

The education system in the United States is just one example of the inequality and neglect that is perpetuated by our entire government and the effect this has on innocent children should be concerning to us all. Yet while Lori is aware of and brings attention to all the problems and challenges facing both teachers and kids today, she never loses hope or fails to see an opportunity for healing and transformation. Her life’s mission is to spread light and to let all children know that they deserve unconditional love and validation.

In this conversation, we talked about Lori’s background and how that has guided her, how she has dealt with the unique challenges of her profession, what she has learned and how she hopes that our current crisis can bring focus to the need for reforming and reimagining how we educate children in this country.

We also reference a previous video conversation Lori participated in with our mutual friends Lorie, Mary and Kim which you can find here.

To learn more about Emotional Intelligence, Lori recommends the following online resources:

Wabisabi Learning – This Is How Emotional Intelligence Can Help Your Students Learn

JOURNAL ARTICLE: Developing Emotional Intelligence in Learners with Behavioral Problems: Refocusing Special Education

Understood – Emotional Intelligence: What It Means for Kids

Study.com – The Importance of Emotional Intelligence in Education

Also, feel free to leave any questions or comments you have for Lori on this post or e-mail me at Victoria@AmplifireProject.com if you have questions or anything on your mind you want to talk about.

Watch our video below or on YouTube and don’t forget to subscribe to our channel!


Lori Evangelisto is a SpecialĀ Educator with a huge heart for helping children, especially those that are traumatized and suffering. Her life’s mission is to spread light and let all children know that they deserve unconditional love and validation.

A self taught artist and creative entrepreneur, Victoria Lynn Hall lives in the Kansas City area with 4 spoiled cats. She believes in art and the magic of kindness.

linktr.ee/victorialynnhall

Published by amplifireproject

Creative Coordinator of Amplifire Project.

2 thoughts on “Teaching Hope

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